WOGE #267

Feb. 8th, 2011 09:09 am
reynardo: (Geek)
Brian had a lovely WOGE #266 of the Bikini Atoll, focusing on the Castle Bravo hole. As someone who loves Bert the Turtle, I was able to recognise it, and used my enforced 2 hour delay to dig up the geological info on the whole atoll.

Note to my normal LJ friends - please feel free to try this as well if you think you know the location. You'd be surprised at what people recognise.

WOGE 267

I've been tempted to use this location for quite a while. You'll notice North isn't shown. Make your own assumptions about where it is :-) I've been good with the scale, though.

Click on the picture for the larger version on Flickr, but then come back here for the comments, please.

There are three "Where on Google Earth" games running - Geographical, Archaeological and this Geological one. This is now WOGE(Geological) #267. The rules for this one are here. Quite simply, identify this place (Long and Lat) and give a summary of the geological significance, in the comments on this Livejournal. You should be able to sign in with Open ID, but if not, just leave your name in the comment.

Schott Rule is invoked again with this one. Basically, for every one of these you've won already, you have to wait an hour. What a perfect time to do more in-depth research! GMT is 22:00:00 on Feb 7 2011, New York time is 17:00:00 and in Melbourne it's 09:00:00 on the 8th.

WOGE #263

Feb. 2nd, 2011 12:05 am
reynardo: (Futurama)
I think Felix must be giving me easy ones on purpose - as mentioned before, WOGE #262 was not-that-far-away - The Mallee. Just so you northerner types know, "close by" in Australia is pretty much "anything under 500km away".

So - the next one. A hard decision. Very hard. Finally went with this one because it's got SO MUCH in it!
WOGE 263a

Click on the picture for the larger version on Flickr, but then come back here for the comments, please.

There are three "Where on Google Earth" games running, and this is the geological one number 263. The rules for this one are here. Quite simply, identify this place (Long and Lat) and give a summary of the geological significance, in the comments on this Livejournal. You should be able to sign in with Open ID, but if not, just leave your name in the comment.

I'm invoking the Schott Rule with this one, because with any luck that'll slow things down just a tad. And yes, I can hear some of you already twitching and checking your clocks. This entry posted at 00:01 (Pumpkin Time) in Melbourne on Wednesday Feb 2, (GMT 13:01 Tuesday 1st Feb, US EST 8:01 Tuesday 1st Feb).
reynardo: (Default)
WOGE 262 looked awfully familiar. The trees, the dryness, the dunes - and it didn't take long to pinpoint the actual spot. I can't post all of this to Felix's blog, so I'm putting it here.

The picture Felix used was at 142° 3'39.35"E 34°58'46.24"S, right in the middle of some rather lovely dunes. It's about 20km north of Walpeup and 30km NW of Ouyen.

Wikipedia on the Mallee.

Things about the origins of the Mallee that you've always wanted to know. ) A mysterious Mallee Dino egg

The area is used for wheat growing. Another introduced species is the Alien Dinosaur Egg, also known as the Paddy Melon. When the Afghan camel drivers brought their camels to Australia in the 1880s, they also brought their saddles, which were stuffed with the fibres from the melons. The fibres also contained seeds, so when the saddles split with wear, the seeds landed on the ground and like most of our introduced pests, they went for it.

View from Mount Wycheproof
Myself, I was going to use Mount Wycheproof as a WOGE one of these days. It's the smallest registered mountain, at 148m above sea level, or 43 metres above the plain. Yes, I've climbed it. It's also the world's only source of Wycheproofite. Lord only knows what you'd use it for.
reynardo: (Geek)
I'm in shock - I actually managed to be first person to guess Felix Bossert's Shaving Stubble WOGE 256, with the karst region of the Li River in China. I've had so many postcards from there and my very first instinct was "sinkholes", but then I got distracted. Then he gave a few clues and ... whammo.

So here's the next one.

WOGE257 Click on the picture for the enlarged version. Be aware that I slid the scale up the picture, as otherwise you get the copyright info for the pic and I know some people use that as a clue. This just means that the background behind the scale doesn't quite match the surroundings - it's from about 50 metres further south.

There are three "Where on Google Earth" games running, and this is the geological one number 257. The rules for this one are here. Quite simply, identify this place (Long and Lat) and give a summary of the geological significance.

And I make no apologies for the very very close up picture. All I can say is that I am stunned this place hasn't been used yet (yes, I've checked the "previous winners" file). I am also invoking the Schott Rule, meaning for each previous geological one you've won, you have to wait an hour to answer this one. (One wonders if Ron Schott is still allowed to answer in under a week!). This entry was posted at 7:10:00 Sorry - something didn't click properly. That would have been 00:10:00 GMT on 26 January 2011.

People not on Live Journal - please sign your posts. And I'll be out at an Australia Day Shakespeare reading for a while, so please don't panic when I haven't answered immediately.
reynardo: (Default)
For my regular readers, I've got myself involved in When on Google Earth, a game where you post a picture of a location with archaological significance, and others try to work it out. I was lucky enough to realise that Chris Lyes' WOGE 110 was somewhere in the area of Greece, and then once I found the site I worked out its significance. Considering how beautiful it is there, I think I shall have to head on a fact-finding tour to check it in person.

WOGE #111
Click on the picture for a bigger version, and please comment here rather than on Flickr.

The rules:

Q: What is When on Google Earth?
A: It’s a game for archaeologists, or anybody else willing to have a go!
Q: How do you play it?
A: Simple, you try to identify the site in the picture.
Q: Who wins?
A: The first person to correctly identify the site, including its major period of occupation, wins the game.
Q: What does the winner get?
A: The winner gets bragging rights and the chance to host the next When on Google Earth on his/her own blog!

As a first-time player (long time follower, etc), I hope this isn't too obscure - and on the other hand I do hope it isn't too obvious! :-)

For the curious in my readership, there are three of these games that I've found - WHERE on Google Earth Geological (currently at this site but about to be posted at the next location); Geographical (Slightly different rules, located here with an LJ RSS feed [livejournal.com profile] wongoogleearth); and this WHEN on Google Earth.

So - off you go. If you think you know it, post in the comments, first with the name of the location and its significance gets to do the next one! It's been guessed/deduced/located - the answer is in the comments.

Profile

reynardo: (Default)
reynardo

June 2017

S M T W T F S
    123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930 

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 23rd, 2017 04:37 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios